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Kyodo news summary -5-

TOKYO, Oct. 6 Kyodo

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Anti-nuclear campaign NGO wins Nobel Peace Prize amid N. Korea threat

OSLO - An international group that campaigns to eliminate
nuclear weapons won the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, the
Norwegian Nobel Committee said, warning the world about the growing
risks of nuclear weapons amid escalating threats from North Korea.
The International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, or ICAN,
was recognized "for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic
humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its
ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such
weapons," the committee said.
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Indian military helicopter crashes near China border, 7 dead

NEW DELHI - A military helicopter crashed Friday in India's
northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh, near the disputed border
with China, killing seven personnel who were on board, local media
reported.
The Russian-made Mi-17 V5 transport helicopter of the Indian Air
Force went down around 6 a.m. in a remote, mountainous area of the
state while carrying supplies to a forward army post, the Press Trust
of India said.
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Man admits to killing wife, 5 children before setting fire at home

MITO, Japan - A woman and five children died in a fire Friday
morning at an apartment in Ibaraki Prefecture and her 32-year-old
husband later told police that he killed the six before setting fire
to their home, investigative sources said.
Hirobumi Komatsu was arrested on suspicion of murder after he
confessed to setting fire to the apartment where his 33-year-old wife
Megumi and her four children were found dead. The sixth victim, Mua,
an 11-year-old girl, was confirmed dead after being taken to a
hospital.
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Japanese, Filipino artists to hold "new media art" festival in Manila

MANILA - Japanese and Filipino artists will come together for a
two-week-long art festival starting Oct. 24 in Manila that will
showcase "new media art," an innovative fusion of technology and art.
The "WSK Axis 2017" festival is being organized through
collaboration between the Japan Foundation Asia Center and local
artists who organized past iterations of the festival.
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CDPJ unveils election lineup of 62 candidates, including ex-PM Kan

TOKYO - The new political party formed by the liberal wing of
Japan's collapsing main opposition party announced a list of 62
candidates Friday, including former Prime Minister Naoto Kan, for the
upcoming lower house election.
Kan is among the first batch of candidates for the single-seat
electoral districts in the Oct. 22 election unveiled by the
Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan that was launched earlier
this week by former chief Cabinet secretary Yukio Edano.
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Taiwan to ease ban on food imports from Japan soon: officials

TAIPEI - Taiwan intends to soon ease its ban on food imports
from five Japanese prefectures imposed in the wake of the 2011
Fukushima nuclear disaster, according to government officials.
"I don't think there will be any problem at all," a high-ranking
policy planner told Kyodo News on condition of anonymity.
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NHK chief apologizes to parents of reporter who died from overwork

TOKYO - NHK Chairman Ryoichi Ueda apologized on Friday to the
parents of a 31-year-old reporter who died from overwork at the
public broadcaster in 2013, the broadcaster said.
On Wednesday, NHK made public for the first time that the death
of Miwa Sado was determined by labor standards inspectors in 2014 as
having been caused by overwork. Her family had been calling for NHK
to make the cause of their daughter's death properly known.
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M'bishi Heavy to resume ferry shipbuilding in Nagasaki

TOKYO - Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. is planning to resume
ferry shipbuilding at its Nagasaki plant in fiscal 2020 after halting
operations five years ago, given a land transport crunch due to the
labor shortage in Japan, a company executive said Friday.
Eyeing growing demand for sea transport, the company will start
building ferries again at its oldest shipyard in southwestern Japan,
Senior Vice President Koji Okura said in an interview with Kyodo News.
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U.S. Congress report airs concerns over "erosion" of H.K. autonomy

HONG KONG - A U.S. congressional committee has expressed
concerns over the continued erosion of Hong Kong's autonomy under the
"one country, two systems" principle.
In an report issued Thursday in Washington, the
Congressional-Executive Commission said recent events Hong Kong
underscore Chinese authorities' failure to honor autonomy and
democratic development that were promised when the former British
colony was returned to Chinese rule in 1997.
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Dollar climbs to 113 yen on upbeat U.S. data, Fed remarks

TOKYO - The U.S. dollar climbed to around the 113 yen line
Friday in Tokyo, drawing support from upbeat U.S. economic data and
remarks from Federal Reserve officials signaling another interest
rate hike by year-end.
At 5 p.m., the dollar fetched 112.99-113.01 yen compared with
112.76-86 yen in New York and 112.69-70 yen in Tokyo at 5 p.m.
Thursday. It moved between 112.76 yen and 113.06 yen during the day,
changing hands most frequently at 113.00 yen.
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Nissan files recall of 1.2 million cars over mishandled safety checks

TOKYO - Nissan Motor Co. on Friday filed the recall of nearly
1.2 million vehicles with Japan's transport ministry after the
automaker was revealed to have allowed uncertified inspectors to
perform safety checks at domestic factories.
Probes by the ministry and Nissan found the automaker to have
carried out illegitimate inspections at all six of its car assembly
plants in Japan, with at least five plants suspected of deliberately
falsifying paperwork to cover up the practice.
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Abe seeks Party of Hope's support for proposed constitutional revision

TOKYO - Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Friday he wants to gain
the support of parties including the Party of Hope, led by Tokyo Gov.
Yuriko Koike, on amending the Constitution after the Oct. 22 lower
house election.
In an interview with Kyodo News ahead of the start of official
campaigning on Tuesday, Abe said his Liberal Democratic Party will
seek to cooperate broadly with other parties on proposing a
first-ever reform to the 70-year-old Constitution.


Kyodo news summary -4-

TOKYO, Oct. 6 Kyodo

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7 killed in Indian Air Force helicopter crash near China border

NEW DELHI - A air force helicopter crashed Friday in India's
northeastern state of Arunachal Pradesh, near the border with China,
killing seven military personnel, local media reported.
The Press Trust of India quoted a senior air force official as
saying the Russian-made Mi-17 V5 helicopter went down around 6 a.m.
in a remote, mountainous area of the state while carrying supplies to
a forward army post.
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Group campaigning to eliminate nuclear weapons wins Nobel Peace Prize

OSLO - An international group that campaigns to eliminate
nuclear weapons won the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, the
Norwegian Nobel Committee said.
The committee said the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear
Weapons, or ICAN, was recognized "for its work to draw attention to
the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear
weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based
prohibition of such weapons."
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Court orders Dentsu to pay fine for illegal working hours

TOKYO - A court ordered Japanese advertising giant Dentsu Inc.
on Friday to pay 500,000 yen ($4,400) for labor practice violations,
resulting in the suicide of a new recruit due to excessive working
hours.
"Illegal long working hours were becoming the norm" at Dentsu,
judge Tsutomu Kikuchi said. "It cannot be overlooked" that the
practice led to the death of the 24-year-old Matsuri Takahashi in
December 2015, the ruling of the Tokyo Summary Court said.
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Japan's key bond yield rises on higher stocks

TOKYO - The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government
bond ended higher Friday as investors sold the safe-haven debt on
higher Japanese and U.S. stocks.
The yield on the No. 348, 0.1 percent issue, the main yardstick
of long-term interest rates, ended interdealer trading at 0.050
percent, up 0.010 percentage point from Thursday's close.
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Party of Hope vows to halt tax hike, debate Constitution's Article 9

TOKYO - Japan's newly formed Party of Hope, led by Tokyo Gov.
Yuriko Koike, announced Friday its platform for the Oct. 22 lower
house election, featuring promises to freeze a planned sales tax hike
and promote debate on amending the war-renouncing Article 9 of the
Constitution.
The party, which has said it aims to take power from Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling coalition, released nine election
pledges and a 10-point manifesto ahead of the start of official
campaigning next Tuesday.

Kyodo news summary -3-

TOKYO, Oct. 6 Kyodo

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Nikkei marks longest winning streak of 2017 on strong U.S. shares

TOKYO - The Nikkei stock index extended its winning streak on
Friday to five consecutive trading days, its longest run of
successive gains this year, on solid advances in Wall Street
overnight.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average ended up 62.15 points, or
0.30 percent, from Thursday at 20,690.71, its highest close since
Aug. 11, 2015. The broader Topix index of all First Section issues on
the Tokyo Stock Exchange finished 4.67 points, or 0.28 percent,
higher at 1,687.16.
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Police arrest man suspected of setting fire, killing wife, 5 children

MITO, Japan - Police arrested a 32-year-old man on suspicion of
murder Friday after he confessed to setting fire to an apartment in
Ibaraki Prefecture where a woman and four children were found dead.
A sixth victim, an 11-year-old girl, was confirmed dead after
being taken to a hospital.
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5 bodies found after Chinese vessel collision

KYOTO - The Japan Coast Guard said Friday they had found the
bodies of five crew members following a collision between a Chinese
fishing vessel and a Hong Kong-flagged tanker the previous day off
western Japan.
The bodies were found in the capsized Chinese vessel Lurong
Yuanyu 378 when three coast guard patrol vessels searched the area on
Friday morning. The bodies were transferred to another Chinese
vessel, which was fishing with the capsized ship.
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Elderly wheelchair user dies after attack by swarm of hornets

MATSUYAMA, Japan - An 87-year-old woman died in September after
she was stung more than 150 times by a swarm of giant hornets in Ozu,
Ehime Prefecture, as she traveled home from a nursing facility, the
local fire service headquarters said Thursday.
Neither a member of staff from the nursing facility accompanying
her nor paramedics who attended the scene were able to help the
elderly wheelchair user Chieko Kikuchi escape the swarm of Asian
giant hornets, known as suzumebachi in Japan.
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Japan to postpone tax hike if economy worsens to level before late
2012

TOKYO - Japan would not go ahead with a consumption tax hike
planned for October 2019 if the economy deteriorated to the levels
before Prime Minister Shinzo Abe returned to power in late 2012, the
top government spokesman said Friday.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said Japan's job
availability stood at 0.83 and the U.S. dollar had been as low as 75
yen before Abe's Liberal Democratic Party won a landslide victory and
the prime minister launched his economic policy mix dubbed
"Abenomics" in December 2012.
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Doctor negligence suspected over death after delivery under anesthetic

OSAKA - Police on Friday referred a doctor at an Osaka maternity
clinic to prosecutors on suspicion of negligence over the death of a
mother who gave birth in January under epidural anesthesia.
Masaaki Oiki, 59, is suspected of failing to provide the
31-year-old mother Chie Nagamura with adequate medical treatment
during her delivery at his clinic in Izumi, Osaka Prefecture.
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Party of Hope vows to halt tax hike, debate Constitution's Article 9

TOKYO - Japan's newly formed Party of Hope, led by Tokyo Gov.
Yuriko Koike, announced Friday its platform for the Oct. 22 lower
house election, featuring promises to freeze a planned sales tax hike
and promote debate on amending the war-renouncing Article 9 of the
Constitution.
The party, which has said it aims to take power from Prime
Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling coalition, released nine election
pledges and a 10-point manifesto ahead of the start of official
campaigning next Tuesday.
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European envoys call on Japan to abolish death penalty

TOKYO - Three European ambassadors to Japan on Friday called on
Tokyo to abolish the practice of capital punishment prior to next
week's World and European Day against the Death Penalty.
"As friends, we should share our experience and speak our mind,"
Viorel Isticioaia-Budura, the European Union's ambassador to Japan,
told a press conference in Tokyo. "The EU has, on a number of
occasions, called on the Japanese authorities to abolish the death
penalty or at least put a moratorium in place and have a debate."
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Over 50,000 guns surrendered in Australian amnesty program

SYDNEY - Over 50,000 illegal firearms were surrendered to
authorities across Australia during a three-month amnesty program
that ended last month, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said Friday.
The National Firearms Amnesty, the first such program in more
than 20 years, allowed people to hand in illegal guns without
prosecution.
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Transport industry workers suffered most from brain, heart disorder

TOKYO - Transport and postal businesses had the highest number
of workers recognized to have suffered from brain and heart disorders
including death by overwork, the government said in a white paper
approved Friday.
The transport and mailing businesses comprised about 30 percent
of the total cases between 2010 and 2015 with 464 workers affected
followed by the wholesale and retail businesses with 229. The
manufacturing industry ranked top in terms of work-related mental
disorders at 349, according to the white paper.


Kyodo news summary -2-

TOKYO, Oct. 6 Kyodo

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Japan, U.S. to hold 2nd high-level economic dialogue on Oct. 16

TOKYO - Japan and the United States will hold the second round
of their high-level economic dialogue in Washington on Oct. 16,
Japan's deputy prime minister Taro Aso said Friday.
"Defending our national interests, we hope to have constructive
discussions and deepen economic relations so Japan and the United
States can build a win-win relationship," Aso, who doubles as finance
minister, told reporters after a Cabinet meeting.
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Nikkei hits 26-month high in morning on strong U.S. shares

TOKYO - Tokyo stocks rose Friday morning, with the Nikkei index
briefly hitting its highest intraday level since August 2015, on
solid advances in Wall Street overnight.
The 225-issue Nikkei Stock Average rose 50.62 points, or 0.25
percent, from Thursday to 20,679.18. The broader Topix index of all
First Section issues on the Tokyo Stock Exchange was up 3.83 points,
or 0.23 percent, at 1,686.32.
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Japanese bond futures fall in morning

TOKYO - The price of the key futures contract for 10-year
Japanese government bonds fell Friday morning with investors locking
in earlier gains ahead of Japan's three-day weekend.
The price of the December futures contract dropped 0.03 point
from Thursday to 150.50 on the Osaka Exchange.
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Vatican cardinal to face March court hearing over sex offenses

SYDNEY - Cardinal George Pell, the Vatican's finance chief, will
return to court in Australia next March to face a four-week hearing
over historical sexual assault charges, a magistrate said Friday.
The 76-year-old's appearance at the Melbourne Magistrates' Court
in the state of Victoria was his second, following a brief appearance
in July. He has strongly denied the charges against him, details of
which have not been made public.
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Prince Akishino to visit Thailand for late king's funeral

TOKYO - Prince Akishino and his wife Princess Kiko will visit
Thailand for two days from Oct. 26 to attend the country's late King
Bhumibol Adulyadej's funeral ceremony, the Japanese government said
Friday.
The Cabinet approved the visit the same day. Prince Akishino,
the younger of Emperor Akihito's two sons, had met several times with
the late Thai king who died in October last year, according to the
Imperial Household Agency.
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Kao eyes doubling of market share with new products in Malaysia

KUALA LUMPUR - Kao Corp., Japan's top toiletry manufacturer, is
seeking to double its market share in Malaysia on the back of new
products, including "safe and effective" solutions to sensitive skin,
according to the head of a local subsidiary.
"We've found that Malaysian consumers are lacking awareness of
sensitive skin," Masaki Fujiwara, president of Kao (Malaysia) Sdn.
Bhd., said in Kuala Lumpur on Wednesday during the official launch of
Curel, the company's sensitive skincare brand.
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6 die in apartment fire in eastern Japan, man surrenders to police

MITO, Japan - Six people, including five children, died after a
fire engulfed an apartment in eastern Japan early Friday morning,
with a man who claimed to have deliberately started the blaze handing
himself in to police.
The man, 32, who also suffered burns, said, "My wife and five
children were in my house," according to the police, who believe
those who died were a woman, four boys aged 3 to 6, and an
11-year-old girl.
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Hibakusha hands U.N. petition for nuke-free world signed by 5 mil.

NEW YORK - A Japanese atomic bomb survivor on Thursday handed to
disarmament officials at the United Nations headquarters a petition
signed by over 5 million people around the globe calling for a world
free of nuclear weapons.
Sueichi Kido, secretary general of Nihon Hidankyo, or the Japan
Confederation of A-and H-bomb Sufferers Organizations, presented the
"Appeal of the Hibakusha" to the chair of the General Assembly
committee charged with tackling disarmament and international
security issues.
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Japan's real wages mark 1st rise in 8 months

TOKYO - Japan's real wages grew 0.1 percent in August from a
year earlier for the first rise in eight months, reflecting the
recent upward trend in base salary, the labor ministry said on Friday.
The moderate gain in inflation-adjusted wages came despite the
continued rise in the consumer prices due to higher energy costs.
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U.S. gun lobby backs more regulation after Las Vegas shooting

NEW YORK - The National Rifle Association said Thursday it
supports tighter regulation on rapid-fire devices of the kind used in
the Las Vegas mass shooting.
"The NRA believes that devices designed to allow semi-automatic
rifles to function like fully-automatic rifles should be subject to
additional regulations," NRA leaders Wayne LaPierre and Chris Cox
said in a statement.

Kyodo news summary -1-

TOKYO, Oct. 6 Kyodo

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6 die in apartment fire in eastern Japan, man surrenders to police

MITO, Japan - Six people, including five children, died after a
fire engulfed an apartment in eastern Japan early Friday morning,
with a man who claimed to have deliberately started the blaze handing
himself in to police.
The man, 32, who also suffered burns, said, "My wife and five
children were in my house," according to the police, who believe
those who died were a woman, four boys aged 3 to 6, and an
11-year-old girl.
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Japan's real wages mark 1st rise in 8 months

TOKYO - Japan's real wages grew 0.1 percent in August from a
year earlier for the first rise in eight months, reflecting the
recent upward trend in base salary, the labor ministry said on Friday.
The moderate gain in inflation-adjusted wages came despite the
continued rise in the consumer prices due to higher energy costs.
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U.S. gun lobby backs more regulation after Las Vegas shooting

NEW YORK - The National Rifle Association said Thursday it
supports tighter regulation on rapid-fire devices of the kind used in
the Las Vegas mass shooting.
"The NRA believes that devices designed to allow semi-automatic
rifles to function like fully-automatic rifles should be subject to
additional regulations," NRA leaders Wayne LaPierre and Chris Cox
said in a statement.
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Nagasaki rejoices over Ishiguro's winning Nobel Prize in literature

NAGASAKI - The city of Nagasaki, the birth place of British
novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, reveled Thursday in the news that Ishiguro
has been awarded the Nobel Prize in literature.
The 62-year-old author was born in the southwestern Japan city
on Nov. 8, 1954, and lived there until age five when his family moved
to Britain.
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Foreign intelligence agencies plan terrorist act: Pakistan army

ISLAMABAD - A Pakistan army spokesman said Thursday that four
foreign intelligence agencies were planning a major act of terrorism
in Pakistan.
Major General Asif Ghafoor told a briefing in Rawalpindi that
the previous day the army informed the Foreign Office of the threat
posed by "four hostile intelligence agencies."
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British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro wins Nobel Prize in literature

STOCKHOLM - Japan-born British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, best
known for his 1989 novel "The Remains of the Day," has won this
year's Nobel Prize in literature, the Swedish Academy said Thursday.
The academy said the 62-year-old Ishiguro "in novels of great
emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense
of connection with the world." He became the third Japanese-born
writer to receive the prize, after Yasunari Kawabata in 1968 and
Kenzaburo Oe in 1994.
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Pro-China activists jailed for damaging Japanese-era statues in Taipei

TAIPEI - A Taiwan court found four pro-China activists guilty of
vandalizing a pair of stone komainu or lion-dog statues dating back
to the Japanese colonial period and sentenced them to time behind
bars on Thursday.
The Shilin District Court sentenced Lee Cheng-lung and his
female accomplice, Chiu Chin-wen, to five months in prison, and two
others to four months imprisonment. They can appeal their verdicts to
a higher court.
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Nobel winner Ishiguro tells universal tales through medium of memory

TOKYO - Japanese-born British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, the
winner of this year's Nobel Prize in literature, has spent his career
weaving layers of memory into stories that have moved readers around
the world.
In a 2015 interview with Kyodo News while on a visit to Japan,
Ishiguro, now 62, said he started writing novels to preserve what he
remembered of the country he had left behind as a young child.